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Summer is finally upon us. Among all the summer vacations, family reunions, picnics, and days at the pool; something dangerous lurks. Desert cities like Las Vegas, NV, St. George, UT, Phoenix, AZ, and Mesa, AZ house a few unique and even dangerous pests. Here are three desert pests to watch out for this summer:

Desert Recluses

  [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="500"]Desert Recluse - Loxosceles sp. Desert Recluse - Loxosceles sp. (Photo credit: Lynette S.)[/caption]   Commonly confused with the Brown Recluse spider, the Desert Recluse spider is equally as dangerous. Desert recluses are found in Southern Nevada, Southwest Utah, and Western Arizona. Not too many Desert Recluses invade the actual cities of Mesa or Phoenix; however, both cities do harbor the Arizona Brown Spider which is also in the recluse family. These recluse spiders hide in dark places. Desert Recluse spiders are tan in color, and have a dark brown violin shaped spot on their head. These spiders are not aggressive in nature, but do bite when bothered. Many homeowners in desert cities are bitten when they accidently touch the venomous spiders. When bitten, a victim will experience pain, swelling, and redness around the site. The site will begin to blister, causing open lesions and sores. Bites can take months to heal and even require skin grafts. Those with compromised immune systems, and the young and elderly, are at the most risk to a Desert Recluse bite. Death can be a result on rare occasions.

Arizona Bark Scorpions

  [caption id="attachment_3463" align="aligncenter" width="509"]Bark Scorpion Arizona Bark Scorpion[/caption]   Throughout all of the southwest, Arizona Bark scorpions wreak havoc on unsuspecting homeowners. If you live in a desert city, you’ve seen one of these scorpions before. While most other species of scorpion live solitarily, these scorpions congregate in groups. When you see one of these scorpions in your Arizona, Nevada, or Utah home; there are bound to be more. Feeding on crickets and roaches near your desert home, these nocturnal pests ambush their prey. Typically, Arizona Bark scorpions come into your home looking for water and refuge from the elements. It is then when unfortunate encounters occur. Hiding inside your shoe, or underneath a discarded article of clothing or towel; these pests sting you when you accidently encounter them. Their stings cause an unpleasant reaction that can include nausea, numbness, vomiting, breathing difficulties or convulsions.

Sun Spiders

  [caption id="attachment_3464" align="aligncenter" width="849"]Sun Spider Sun Spider[/caption]   Because of the several embellished myths about their size, speed, behavior, appetite, and lethality; many people who encounter a sun spider are deathly afraid of them. Sun spiders, also known as camel spiders or wind scorpions, are neither spiders nor scorpions and have no venom. They do however, exhibit very aggressive behavior and may attack for no reason at all. They can run up to 10 mph and have large, powerful jaws that can produce an irregularly large bite. Antibiotic treatment is necessary if a bite becomes infected.

 Bulwark Pest Control

Desert cities like Phoenix, AZ, Mesa, AZ, Las Vegas, NV, and St. George, UT house a wide and diverse variety of pests. Don’t let desert pests like Bark scorpions, Sun Spiders, and Desert Recluses spoil your fun this summer. Get Bulwark Pest Control!

1-877-289-0444

 

Spring Baseball & Scorpions

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="300"]English: A frontal view of the Bark Scorpion o... English: A frontal view of the Bark Scorpion of Arizona. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)[/caption] Spring is in the air here in Arizona, and that can only mean one thing… MLB Spring Training! Every year, 15 Major League Baseball teams ascend on the Valley of the Sun for six weeks of preseason baseball. Teams like the Chicago Cubs, Los Angeles Dodgers, San Francisco Giants, and Cleveland Indians all square off in the Cactus League; preparing for the upcoming season. Teams frequently use players' spring training performances as a way of assigning starting roles and roster spots. While spring training attracts a huge number of fans and spectators who eager to see the promising new talent, all while enjoying the warm weather, it also happens to coincide with the beginning of the scorpion season here in Arizona. Nobody knows that better then Milwaukee Brewers GM, Doug Melvin, who was recently stung by a very venomous Arizona Bark Scorpion… The most dangerous scorpion found in the U.S.

Brewers GM Stung By Scorpion

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="300"]English: Brewers General Manager Doug Melvin English: Brewers General Manager Doug Melvin (Photo credit: Wikipedia)[/caption] The Milwaukee Brewers MLB club has descended on Maryvale Baseball Park, in Phoenix, AZ for their annual spring training. While in town, Doug Melvin, the General Manager of the Brewers, was stung by a scorpion. It all went down last Wednesday, March 5, 2013. Melvin and his wife had just enjoyed a night out in the Valley. Upon returning to their Phoenix-area condo after dinner, Melvin’s wife spotted a “bug” on the floor. After eyeing the bug, she shouted to her husband to take care of it. In an attempt to be the hero and save the day, the Brewers GM grabbed a tissue and picked up the bug—which happened to be a scorpion. The scorpion retaliated by stinging Melvin’s left middle finger through the tissue. Ouch! After the sting, Melvin’s arm began to tingle—kind of like hitting your funny bone. His left arm began to feel numb. The sensation moved from his arm to his shoulder. About this time, he began to worry that the venom might be spreading and eventually reach his heart. He headed to a Scottsdale emergency room where he was treated for the sting. After three hours in the ER, some pain medication, and some scorpion education, the Brewers GM made a full recovery. The next time he encounters a scorpion, he’ll likely just squash it with his shoe.

Symptoms Of A Bark Scorpion Sting

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="300"]English: Closeup (macrograph) of the barb of a... English: Closeup (macrograph) of the barb of an Arizona Bark Scorpion. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)[/caption] In Arizona alone, the Arizona Bark Scorpion is responsible for several thousand stings each year. With that being said, fatalities in the United States are rare, and generally limited to small/young children and adults with weakened immune systems. The symptoms of a Bark Scorpion sting include: pain, tingling sensations, blurry vision, throat swelling, darting eyes, and tense muscles. Those experiencing an allergic reaction will have difficulty breathing and walking, and should seek medical attention.

The Arizona Bark Scorpion

The Arizona Bark scorpion is a golden tan in color, and can reach lengths of about two inches. They are frequently found in the southwest United States; predominately in the Sonoran Desert. Less toxic species of Bark scorpions have been discovered throughout areas in Southern Utah, New Mexico, Nevada and Texas. Bark scorpions prefer to hunt at night by ambushing their prey. They commonly dine on crickets and cockroaches.

Scorpion Control

As Doug Melvin can attest, being stung by a scorpion is not a pleasant experience. Whether you live in Arizona, Texas, or Southern Utah; you don’t have to live in fear of these malevolent pests. Bulwark Exterminating is an expert when it comes to Scorpion Control, having treated some 25,000 scorpion infested homes. Bulwark’s signature treatment, administered by highly experienced technicians, will create a barrier around your home that will keep those stinging scorpions away. Call us to find out about our nocturnal treatments, and our highly specialized scorpion truck.

1-877-289-0444